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meagan_taylor

Axe me something.   I like: Doctor Who, Torchwood, Golden Girls, Heavy Weights, Watchmen, Futurama, X-Files, the 1950s, retro future/space age, tattoos, chubby dudes and cool stuff.
I am: an assistant editor and sound editor (professionally) and an editor (freelance). I draw comics and take photos, but not enough. I live with my boyfriend and my cat, who are both furry and cute.

5 Ways Modern Men are Trained to Hate Women →

stfuconservatives:

stfufauxminists:

stfuconservatives:

In the continuing series of “surprisingly honest and even feminist stuff on Cracked.com” articles, author David Wong looks at the main reasons men hate and resent women. He argues that a mix of social conditioning and genetics make men paranoid about women’s ulterior motives AND leads them to believe women owe them something just for existing.

Like I said, surprisingly honest stuff. Although I’m having a *little* trouble taking this article seriously when this is the ad running beneath it:

GUYS. COME ON GUYS.

-Jess

Am I the only person who didn’t like this article?

I dunno, I found the biological determinism and the “HUR HUR MEN THINK ABOUT SEX ALL THE TIME” to be irritating and counter-intuitive to what the article was supposed to be about. It essentially amounted to “Men are trained to hate you, but also they have hormones so they hate you because of their penises or something, so hey, take pity on them”.

Also, the whole “men have penises” cissexism.

I just didn’t think it was that effective. It started out well but just got bad.

Yeah, I’m still not sure how I feel about it. And it definitely uses biological determinism, not to mention heterosexism. I’ve never been a fan of the “he couldn’t help himself, boys will be boys” defense, but like I said, this article was surprisingly candid and refreshing. I liked the way it talked about various kinds of social conditioning.

-Jess

Digging this so far. 

(Source: stfuconservatives, via stfuconservatives)

— 2 years ago with 556 notes
#sexism 
tooyoungforthelivingdead:

cwnl:

Individual’s Sexism Leads to Gender Inequality In Whole Society
Individual beliefs don’t stay confined to the person who has them; they can affect how a society functions. A new study published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science, looks at 57 countries and finds that an individual’s sexism leads to gender inequality in the society as a whole—not surprising, but it is the largest study to find this relationship.
“I’m interested in the consequences people’s beliefs about how the world should work and how the world does work,” says Mark Brandt of DePaul University, the author of the new study. For this study on sexism, he used data from an international survey conducted between 2005 and 2007. The survey included two statements to measure sexism: “On the whole, men make better political leaders than women do” and “On the whole, men make better business executives than women do.” He also used a United Nations measure of gender inequality, from the year the sexism question was asked and from 2009
Brandt found that sexism was directly associated with increases in gender inequality overtime.
“You could get the impression that having sexist beliefs, or prejudiced beliefs more generally, is just an individual thing—‘my beliefs don’t impact you,’” Brandt says. But this study shows that isn’t true. If individual people in a society are sexist, men and women in that society become less equal.
“Gender inequality is such a tough beast to crack because there are so many contributing factors,” Brandt says. Policies can contribute to inequality—and some countries have insured some measure of equality by mandating that some number of seats in the legislature be reserved for women. But this study suggests that if the goal is increased equality, individual attitudes have to change.

good study!

tooyoungforthelivingdead:

cwnl:

Individual’s Sexism Leads to Gender Inequality In Whole Society

Individual beliefs don’t stay confined to the person who has them; they can affect how a society functions. A new study published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science, looks at 57 countries and finds that an individual’s sexism leads to gender inequality in the society as a whole—not surprising, but it is the largest study to find this relationship.

“I’m interested in the consequences people’s beliefs about how the world should work and how the world does work,” says Mark Brandt of DePaul University, the author of the new study. For this study on sexism, he used data from an international survey conducted between 2005 and 2007. The survey included two statements to measure sexism: “On the whole, men make better political leaders than women do” and “On the whole, men make better business executives than women do.” He also used a United Nations measure of gender inequality, from the year the sexism question was asked and from 2009

Brandt found that sexism was directly associated with increases in gender inequality overtime.

“You could get the impression that having sexist beliefs, or prejudiced beliefs more generally, is just an individual thing—‘my beliefs don’t impact you,’” Brandt says. But this study shows that isn’t true. If individual people in a society are sexist, men and women in that society become less equal.

“Gender inequality is such a tough beast to crack because there are so many contributing factors,” Brandt says. Policies can contribute to inequality—and some countries have insured some measure of equality by mandating that some number of seats in the legislature be reserved for women. But this study suggests that if the goal is increased equality, individual attitudes have to change.

good study!

(via loveyourchaos)

— 2 years ago with 712 notes
#sexism 
"Most guys, we can recite all of The Godfather, we can recite all of Caddyshack, we can do those kinds of things. Women, by and large, can’t. You guys can say “you complete me”, and that’s about it. And I think it’s because in the history of movies, there have been fewer quotable lines spoken by actresses than actors."

Aaron Sorkin

(via elesheva)

Is this an indictment on male-centric Hollywood, or just Sorkin being a dick?

And really- “you complete me”? That’s the most iconic thing you can think of that a woman’s ever said on screen?

"After all, tomorrow is another day."

"There’s no place like home."

"Mr. DeMille, I’m ready for my close-up."

"Why don’t you come upstairs and see me sometime?"

"No more wire hangers!"

And for Christ’s sake, even, “I’ll have what she’s having.”

(via somethingofthewolf)

— 2 years ago with 1232 notes
#aaron sorkin  #sexism 
"It’s like Hollywood decided that we were all psychotically jealous ex-boyfriends, or strict dads, and everyone just went with it."
5 Old-Timey Prejudices That Still Show Up in Every Movie | Cracked.com 

(Source: cracked.com)

— 2 years ago with 2 notes
#cracked  #sexism  #movies  #prejudices 
"When a beautiful actress is cast in a movie, executives rack their brains to find some kind of flaw in the character she plays that will still allow her to be palatable. She can’t be overweight or not perfect-looking, because who would pay to see that? A female who is not one hundred per cent perfect-looking in every way? You might as well film a dead squid decaying on a beach somewhere for two hours. So they make her a Klutz. The hundred-per-cent-perfect-looking female is perfect in every way except that she constantly bonks her head on things. She trips and falls and spills soup on her affable date (Josh Lucas. Is that his name? I know it’s two first names. Josh George? Brad Mike? Fred Tom? Yes, it’s Fred Tom). The Klutz clangs into stop signs while riding her bike and knocks over giant displays of fine china in department stores. Despite being five feet nine and weighing a hundred and ten pounds, she is basically like a drunk buffalo who has never been a part of human society. But Fred Tom loves her anyway."

Mindy Kaling on the women who only exist in romantic comedies | Flick Chicks (via rufustfirefly)

I’m only halfway through this article and I love it already.

(via somethingofthewolf)

— 2 years ago with 10325 notes
#mindy kaling  #sexism  #movies  #women in film 
"We definitely don’t want to live in a world where boys routinely see women breastfeeding. They might grow up with the idea that breasts exist for something other than their amusement."

Margaret Hartmann, “Porn Star Publicly Breastfeeds Baby, Gets Accused of Promoting Pedophilia” at Jezebel. (via aaabbbbbbiiieee)

I think the article title is a little misleading, but the quote is dynamite.

(Source: jezebel.com, via )

— 2 years ago with 20558 notes
#breastfeeding  #sexism  #Margaret Hartmann  #women 
RHPolitics: bana05: How media clearly reflects the sexism and the racism we cannot... →

bana05:

How media clearly reflects the sexism and the racism we cannot see in ourselves.

I wanted my first-year film students to understand what happens to a story when actual human beings inhabit your characters, and the way they can inspire storytelling. And I wanted to teach them how to look at headshots and what you might be able to tell from a headshot. So for the past few years I’ve done a small experiment with them.

It works like this: I bring in my giant file of head shots, which include actors of all races, sizes, shapes, ages, and experience levels. Each student picks a head shot from the stack and gets a few minutes to sit with the person’s face and then make up a little story about them. 

Namely, for white men, they have no trouble coming up with an entire history, job, role, genre, time, place, and costume. They will often identify him without prompting as “the main character.” The only exception? “He would play the gay guy.” For white women, they mostly do not come up with a job (even though it was specifically asked for), and they will identify her by her relationships. “She would play the mom/wife/love interest/best friend.” I’ve heard “She would play the slut” or “She would play the hot girl.” A lot more than once.

For nonwhite men, it can be equally depressing. “He’s in a buddy cop movie, but he’s not the main guy, he’s the partner.” “He’d play a terrorist.” “He’d play a drug dealer.” “A thug.” “A hustler.” “Homeless guy.” One Asian actor was promoted to “villain.”

For nonwhite women (grab onto something sturdy, like a big glass of strong liquor), sometimes they are “lucky” enough to be classified as the girlfriend/love interest/mom, but I have also heard things like “Well, she’d be in a romantic comedy, but as the friend, you know?” “Maid.” “Prostitute.” “Drug addict.”

I should point out that the responses are similar whether the group is all or mostly-white or extremely racially mixed, and all the groups I’ve tried this with have been about equally balanced between men and women, though individual responses vary. Women do a little better with women, and people of color do a little better with people of color, but female students sometimes forget to come up with a job for female actors and black male students sometimes tell the class that their black male actor wouldn’t be the main guy.

Once the students have made their pitches, we interrogate their opinions. “You seem really sure that he’s not the main character – why? What made you automatically say that?” “You said she was a mom. Was she born a mom, or did she maybe do something else with her life before her magic womb opened up and gave her an identity? Who is she as a person?” In the case of the “thug“, it turns out that the student was just reading off his film resume. This brilliant African American actor who regularly brings houses down doing Shakespeare on the stage and more than once made me weep at the beauty and subtlety of his performances, had a list of film credits that just said “Thug #4.” “Gang member.” “Muscle.” Because that’s the film work he can get. Because it puts food on his table.

So, the first time I did this exercise, I didn’t know that it would turn into a lesson on racism, sexism, and every other kind of -ism. I thought it was just about casting. But now I know that casting is never just about casting, and this day is a real teachable opportunity. Because if we do this right, we get to the really awkward silence, where the (now mortified) students try to sink into their chairs. Because, hey, most of them are proud Obama voters! They have been raised by feminist moms! They don’t want to be or see themselves as being racist or sexist. But their own racism and sexism is running amok in the room, and it’s awkward.

This for every time someone criticizes how characters of color and female characters of color especially are treated in text and by subsequent fandoms.  It’s never “just a television/movie/book”. It’s never been ”just”.

(Source: letthetruthlaugh, via )

— 2 years ago with 15294 notes
#racism  #sexism